advising someone


advising someone
There are many ways of giving someone advice.
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In conversation, or in informal writing such as letters to friends, you can use `I should', `I would', or `I'd'.

I have someone here for you. I should come and pick him up straight away.

I would try to restrain him gently by saying `It isn't polite.'

I'd buy tins of one vegetable rather than mixtures.

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People often emphasize these expressions with `if I were you'.

If I were you, I'd just take the black one.

I should let it go if I were you.

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You can also say `You ought to...' or `You should...'. People often say `I think' first, in order not to sound too forceful.

You should explain this to him at the outset.

If you don't like your neighbours, I think you should start trying to get on with them.

I think maybe you ought to try a different approach.

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You can indicate to someone which course of action or choice is likely to be most successful by using the informal expression `Your best bet is...' or `...is your best bet'.

Well, your best bet is to go to Thomas Cook in the High Street.

I think Boston's going to be your best bet.

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firm advice
If you want to give advice firmly, especially if you are in a position of authority, you can say `You'd better...'. This way of giving advice can also be used as a kind way of telling someone to do something that will benefit them.

You'd better write it down.

You'd better get a job.

Perhaps you'd better listen to him.

I think you'd better go in and have a sit down.

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When you are talking to someone you know well, you can use an imperative form. However, you should not use an imperative to give advice in any other situation.

That's one of the nicest girls I've met for a long time. Make sure you don't lose her.

Take no notice of him, Mr Swallow.

`We have nothing about this from our Department,' he said. `Well, phone your Minister,' I said.

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People sometimes add `and' followed by a good consequence of taking the advice, or `or' followed by a bad consequence. These structures are similar in meaning to conditional sentences.

Stick with me and you'll be okay.

Now hold onto the chain, or you'll hurt yourself.

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Note that `and' and `or' are also used like this in threats.

Just try — and you'll have a real fight on your hands.

Drop that gun! Drop it or I'll kill you!

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Imperative forms are also used by experts to give advice: see the section on professional advice later in this entry.
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serious advice
A more formal and serious way of giving advice is to say `I advise you to...'.

`What shall I do about it?' —-`I advise you to consult a doctor, Mrs Smedley.'

If you have never used explosives I strongly advise you to get somebody who has used them to come and help you the first time.

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A very strong way of giving advice is to say `You must...'.

You must tell the pupils what it is you want to do, so that they feel involved.

You must maintain absolute control of the shot at all times.

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professional advice
There are other ways of giving advice which are used mainly in books, articles, and broadcasts.
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One common way is to use an imperative form.

If you are left with a nasty burnt mess in your saucepans, try soaking them overnight in lukewarm water and detergent.

Clean one room at a time.

Choose an activity that really fits in with your way of life.

If you don't have a freezer, keep bread in a dry, cool, well-ventilated bin.

Make sure you get out all weed roots and grass.

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Another way of advising that is used mainly in writing and broadcasting is to say `It's a good idea to...'.

It's a good idea to spread your savings between several building societies.

It's a good idea to get a local estate agent to come and value your house.

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Another expression that is used is `My advice is...' or `My advice would be...'. Again, this is used especially by professionals or experts, who have knowledge on which to base their advice.

If you are thinking of going out to practise when it is blowing a gale, my advice is: stay at home.

My advice would always be: find out what the local people consider good to eat in your locality and eat that.

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The expression `A word of advice' is sometimes used to introduce a piece of advice.

A word of advice — never be put off by those who suggest that practising is somehow un-British.

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suggestions and warnings
See also entry at ↑ Suggestions. For information on how to advise someone not to do something, see entry at ↑ Warning someone.
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Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Advising someone — There are many ways of giving someone advice. In conversation, or in informal writing such as letters to friends, you can use I should , I would , or I d . I have someone here for you. I should come and pick him up straight away. I would try to… …   Useful english dictionary

  • someone will not thank you (for something) — phrase used for saying that someone will not be pleased if you do something Future generations will not thank us for wasting resources. Thesaurus: ways of warning or advising someonesynonym Main entry: thank …   Useful english dictionary

  • woe betide someone — often humorous phrase used for warning someone that they will be in trouble if they do a particular thing That was the rule, and woe betide anyone who ignored it. Thesaurus: ways of warning or advising someonesynonym Main entry: woe * * * woe… …   Useful english dictionary

  • give\ someone\ his\ rights — • give someone his rights • read someone his rights v. phr. informal 1. the act of advising arrested criminals that they have the right to remain silent and that everything they say can be held against them in a court of law; that they have the… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • read\ someone\ his\ rights — • give someone his rights • read someone his rights v. phr. informal 1. the act of advising arrested criminals that they have the right to remain silent and that everything they say can be held against them in a court of law; that they have the… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • give someone his rights — or[read someone his rights] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. The act of advising arrested criminals that they have the right to remain silent and that everything they say can be held against them in a court of law; that they have the right to the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • give someone his rights — or[read someone his rights] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. The act of advising arrested criminals that they have the right to remain silent and that everything they say can be held against them in a court of law; that they have the right to the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • give someone an inch (and they'll take a mile) — give someone an inch (and they’ll take a mile/yard/) phrase used for saying that if you agree to give someone something that they want, they will then want to take more Thesaurus: ways of warning or advising someonesynonym Main entry: inch …   Useful english dictionary

  • give someone an inch (and they'll take a yard) — give someone an inch (and they’ll take a mile/yard/) phrase used for saying that if you agree to give someone something that they want, they will then want to take more Thesaurus: ways of warning or advising someonesynonym Main entry: inch …   Useful english dictionary

  • if someone isn't careful — if someone isn’t careful spoken phrase used for warning or threatening someone If you’re not careful, you’ll break it. Thesaurus: ways of warning or advising someonesynonym ways of threatening someonesynonym Main entry …   Useful english dictionary